16 year track record is clear: yes votes for tax initiatives gets Olympia to listen

by | Sep 11, 2015

When voters pass our tax initiatives, the following legislative session is good for taxpayers.  When we don’t qualify or we qualify but voters say no to our tax initiatives, the following legislative session is horrible for taxpayers. 

        There’s been a 16 year track record that proves this to be true:

*  In 1999, voters passed Initiative 695 lowering car tabs.  The following legislative session, in 2000, the Legislature repealed the state motor vehicle excise tax and didn’t raise any taxes.

*  In 2002, voters passed Initiative 776 limiting car tab taxes again.  The following legislative session, in 2003, Dino Rossi and Gary Locke passed a no-new-taxes budget.

*  In 2004, we qualified a property tax initiative for the ballot but voters rejected it.  The following legislative session, in 2005, the Legislature imposed over $9 billion in higher taxes.

*  In 2006, we didn’t qualify our tax initiative for the ballot.  The following legislative session, in 2007, the Legislature went on a massive spending spree, increasing spending an unsustainable 33%, setting us up for massive tax increases later to pay for it.

*  In 2007, we qualified and voters passed Initiative 960 reinstating the 2/3-for-taxes vote requirement.  Not only did Gov. Gregoire call a special session and reinstate the 1% property tax cap, there was not a single tax increase imposed during the 2008 and 2009 legislative sessions.

*  In 2009, we qualified a property tax initiative for the ballot but voters rejected it.  The following legislative session, in 2010, the Legislature suspended the 2/3-for-taxes vote requirement and raised taxes $6.7 billion.

*  In 2010, we qualified and voters approved the resurrection of the 2/3-for-taxes vote requirement.  The following legislative session, in 2011, there weren’t any tax increases.

*  In 2012, we qualified and voters approved the renewal of the 2/3-for-taxes vote requirement.  The following legislative session and the 2014 session resulted in a couple of minor tax hikes. 

*  In 2014, we didn’t qualify our 2/3-for-taxes constitutional amendment initiative for the ballot.  The following legislative session (this year), the Legislature raised taxes a jaw-dropping $17.5 billion. 

         History shows that our initiative efforts result in a rock-solid consistent reaction from Olympia:  legislators interpret the voters approval of our tax initiatives as a mandate to be fiscally responsible and responsive to the people.  Legislators interpret a tax initiative not qualifying or the voters’ rejection of a tax initiative as a green light to be fiscally irresponsible and tax crazy.

         What does this mean for Initiative 1366’s vote in November?  1366’s passage means taxpayers will be helped, 1366’s rejection means taxpayers will be hurt.

         This year’s Legislature raised taxes a jaw-dropping $17.5 billion because last year’s tax initiative didn’t succeed.  We need voters to pass 1366 to make sure taxpayers are protected from legislators who would interpret its failure as a green light to raise taxes.  The passage of Initiative 1366 is the most effective way to protect taxpayers from Olympia’s insatiable tax appetite.  

© 2020 Permanent Offense

 

© 2020 Permanent Offense